Resources

COME HELL OR HIGH WATER Screening Resources

The Discussion Guide guide contains the following for your screening use:
• about the film & filmmakers • ready to watch! screening guide
• ready to talk! discussion guide • ready to act! handout

COME HELL OR HIGH WATER
Screening Poster
(customize for your event)

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COME HELL OR HIGH WATER
Screening Guide
(coming soon)

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Press Stills

Download All
High-Resolution
Press Photos

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Websites

leahmahan.com/comehellorhighwater
Facebook: www.facebook.com/turkeycreekfilm
Twitter: @Leah_Mahan
The filmmaker's website and social media links

Bridge the Gulf Project places the Turkey Creek story in a broader context, connecting viewers to a network of Gulf Coast community journalists with deep roots in diverse communities and fields who report on pressing social and environmental issues.

Reel Power is a collaborative of award-winning documentary filmmakers, individual leaders and organizations working to address climate change and the long-term impact of destructive resource extraction. Reel Power is advancing a sustainable and just energy future through targeted screening events and hands-on trainings across the country.

The Pascagoula River Audubon Center is a part of the National Audubon Society: a 100-plus year old non-profit organization focused on promoting conservation and education about birds and wildlife and the habitats that support them. Audubon and community leaders in Gulfport, Mississippi are protecting Turkey Creek's rich cultural and natural history.

Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain is a member supported, not-for-profit organization whose purpose is to protect the six coastal counties’ natural lands, scenic areas, fresh water resources, and wildlife habitat.

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law works to secure equal justice for all through the rule of law, targeting in particular the inequities confronting African Americans and other racial and ethnic minorities. The Lawyers' Committee is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, formed in 1963 at the request of President John F. Kennedy to enlist the private bar's leadership and resources in combating racial discrimination and the resulting inequality of opportunity - work that continues to be vital today. Click here for the report Protecting Vulnerable Coastal Communities: Meaningful Political Action and Strategies After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Mississippi Center for Justice advances racial and economic justice through an approach that combines legal services with policy advocacy, community education and media advocacy.  The Center partners with national, regional and community organizations and volunteers to develop and implement campaigns that are creating better futures for low-wealth Mississippians and communities of color in the areas of educational opportunity, financial security, access to healthcare, affordable housing and community development. 

Mississippi Department of Archives and History listing for Turkey Creek on the National Register of Historic Places (2009) and Mississippi Heritage Trust 10 Most Endangered Historic Places (2001).

Sierra Club, Mississippi Chapter
The Sierra Club, the nation’s oldest grassroots environmental organization, was established by John Muir in 1892. In Mississippi, the Sierra Club has been active for over two decades, working to protect the health of communities and the environment.

Steps Coalition was formed in 2006, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The mission of the Steps Coalition (“Steps”) is to build a democratic movement to support and create a healthy, just and equitable Mississippi Gulf Coast.

We Are Power Shift is a grassroots-driven online community that seeks to empower and serve as a hub for the youth climate movement.

 

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The Battle for Turkey Creek
“This intimate film tells a gigantic story...It’s about everything that matters in our society.”
Bill Bigelow, Rethinking Schools